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Typical Christmas Day

Well, if you believe that Tornado Watches, Severe Thunderstorm Warnings, and Beach Flooding Advisories are normal.

The cold front that caused all of this finally cleared out at about 11:45PM, and I was not using the computer a great deal during the day, even when I was at home because of the thunderstorms. Let me just say you didn’t need special bulbs or controllers to have blinking Christmas lights around here.

There were reports of tornadoes in Alabama. Mobile was definite with multiple people taking and posting videos of the tornado there. Later this morning it will snow across the northern portions of Mississippi, and possibly Alabama as the cold air behind the front moves in. It was in the 70s locally during the day, but the temperature will drop over night.

Other than the weather it was a quiet Christmas that resulted in the accumulation of cookies and candy and fruit, as it finally sunk in that some people are not kidding when they say they have too much stuff, and ask people not to send them more. Slowly I hope to convince people that it is better if they send stuff to people who don’t have it and need it when they feel obligated to buy something, although cookies are always appreciated.

2 comments

1 Badtux { 12.26.12 at 5:11 pm }

It was raining every frickin’ day of my Christmas holiday here. I’d intended to go backpacking, but ended up hanging around the house instead because I would have needed scuba gear to go backpacking (all the streams had jumped their banks and flooded). Ho ho hum.

2 Bryan { 12.26.12 at 5:35 pm }

I read the ‘boulder incident’ and know what it’s like in the San Diego County back country when it drizzles for more than 10 minutes.

You get rain and a few days later we get tornadoes. This pattern can stop at any time without hurting my feelings in the slightest.

At least we weren’t colder than Fairbanks on Christmas, which happened a few years ago when Alaska got hit with a mid-December ‘Pineapple Express’, a warm Pacific air mass making it over the mountains.