On-line Opinion Magazine…OK, it's a blog
Random header image... Refresh for more!

The Queensland Floods

The ABC latest report: ‘Post-war’ effort needed to rebuild Queensland

Premier Anna Bligh says Queensland is facing a reconstruction effort of post-war proportions as the state battles possibly the worst natural disaster in the country’s history.

The Brisbane River inundated more than 20,000 homes and businesses across the capital when it peaked this morning at 4.46 metres [14.63 feet].

More than 100,000 homes are without power across the city and to the west in Ipswich, where floodwaters are receding rapidly after yesterday’s peak.

But while the water is receding, this morning it claimed the life of a 24-year-old man who was trying to check his father’s house in the south Brisbane suburb of Durack.

His is the 14th person to die in the south-east Queensland floods and first in Brisbane.

There are washed out roads and bridges as well as buildings filled with mud from the floods. Water and sewage treatment plants will be down giving the situation of “water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink” that is common in flooded areas.

The rains have eased off for the moment, but could return at any time. Dams and reservoirs are at the maximum limit, so they can’t provide any meaningful assistance in flood control for the foreseeable future.

There are still dozens of people listed as missing in the state, so the death toll will probably rise as search and rescue teams gain access to the areas that have been flooded.

Update: Via Kryten in comments earlier: The official Australian Bureau of Meteorology River Conditions map.

[Note: if you see references to CBD, that is “Central Business District”]

4 comments

1 Kryten42 { 01.13.11 at 9:41 am }

A quick update…

This weather system is not only affecting Australia, but Indonesia has some serious flooding, and it’s also affected NZ and various Islands in this part of the World. And this is only the START of the tropical cyclone season! Three other cyclones are being tracked, two will miss us mostly (just some ocean wave activity, surfer’s will be pleased), but one may impact the Qld coast again. Won’t know for sure for a few days or so.

15 are confirmed dead, and 60+ are still missing. We should know more soon as rescue crews are able to get into areas they couldn’t before.

I must say that I am impressed that the Fed Gov didn’t mess about and mobilised the Military very quickly. The Army & Navy have some of the best SaR (Search and Rescue) teams in the World, and they are being put to good use. Today, there were some 18 Black Hawk (army) & Sea King (navy) chopper crews on several missions and have rescued many people. Also, the RAAF are providing aircraft from King Air to C130J transports to ferry people and supplies nearby airfields to be redeployed by chopper or vehicles (from Bushmaster’s to heavy AT (all terrain) trucks and tankers). The RAAMC (Royal Australian Army Medical Corps) & Corps of Engineers have been deployed with a platoon of Reservists. As well as Medical facilities & staff, the RAAMC have deployed sanitation units that provide basic sanitation facilities and facilities to purify drinkable water.

I’d also like to say that the Premier of Qld, Anna Bligh has done a remarkable job, and has been going virtually non-stop since the floods began. She has been all over the affected areas and has been doing a great job in giving people hope and the courage to do what needs to be done. Considering she was something of a non-entity before this disaster, she has become a shining beacon. 🙂 Good to see a State Leader actually… leading! What a concept… *sigh*

And to give credit where it’s due, the PM Gillard has done what’s been required and mobilized the Military quickly. 🙂

OK! That will do for now. Thanks again Bryan, and all!

Oh! If anyone would like to make a small donation (every bit helps, but I know times are tough all over). So far, over $AU45million has been donated, but the total cost is expected to be well over $AU10billion! 🙁

Please go here for information on the floods and ways to help and donate:

Queensland Government: Donate to the flood relief appeal

Thanks all. 🙂

2 Bryan { 01.13.11 at 4:35 pm }

It is always a pleasant surprise when the people who are supposed to actually be in charge, take charge and do their jobs, but, more importantly, allow the best resources available do what they have been trained to do. If the Shrubbery and Rumsfeld had allowed the US military to go to New Orleans immediately, instead of allowing things to deteriorate, a lot of lives would have been saved.

I’ve added the donation link to my latest post, as well as references to other flooding problems.

The smart people who built early homes near the Gulf, built them on stilts, with the house over their car ports or garages so the storm surge could flow underneath, instead of through the houses. Of course, later builders decided that wasn’t necessary. You see more old houses than new, still standing after hurricanes.

Try to stay dry, Kryten, and don’t overdo it on the move.

3 Kryten42 { 01.14.11 at 2:20 am }

Our ABC did an interesting editorial about that very thing (how Politicians handle disasters) today. Good timing… 😉

State of crisis: a politician in a disaster zone

Curiously, the Qld flood has raised the image of the Qld Premier Bligh, and Kevin Rudd; whilst lowering Gillard’s image. Th article discusses why, and even Obama get’s some praise for his handling of the Arizona assassinations. Anyway, I thought it was an interesting read. 🙂

What are the ground rules for politicians in this vexed field?
Be useful, and if all you have to offer is words, then make them memorable.

4 Bryan { 01.14.11 at 5:58 pm }

Bill Clinton is the best “disaster” politician I have ever seen. He can connect with people. Jimmy Carter is more useful because he can help you build a house, but no one can beat the “Big Dog” for charging people up. That’s why he keeps getting called to head up appeals for assistance.

I wonder if Ms Gillard has a touch of “stage fright”, if she closes up when if front of cameras. It sounds like she is fine in informal settings, but as soon as the cameras roll, she’s in trouble. She did the right things, especially sending in the military early to help out, but doesn’t seem comfortable talking about it.