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Posts from — June 2019

In Other News

I have been spending my time working on an irrigation system. The time has been split between actual plumbing and locating parts. The basic problem was figuring out why the pump wouldn’t hold its prime. I’m dealing with people who think it’s an imposition to go to the pump house to turn it on. Priming the pump was totally beyond their skill set.

While I have noticed that the current Resident of 1600 PA Ave. continues to violate norms and laws, there’s not much point in commenting if the House refuses to begin impeachment proceedings.

In sports news Chris Froome:

Britain’s four-time Tour de France champion, 34, suffered a fractured right femur, a broken hip, a fractured elbow and fractured ribs and lost consciousness following the crash.

They discovered later that he also had a neck fracture, so he won’t be attempting to win his fifth Yellow Jersey next month.

We are also in the middle of FIFA Women’s World Cup in France. The US is the defending champion. The “usual suspects” are playing well and advancing. The US, Canada, England, Netherlands, France, Germany, Italy, and Sweden are already through to the knock-out round of 16.

The women play a better game than the men – more skill and less muscle.

June 16, 2019   6 Comments

Bloomsday

Bloomsday

According to the James Joyce Center

Bloomsday is a celebration that takes place both in Dublin and around the world. It celebrates Thursday 16 June 1904, which is the day depicted in James Joyce’s novel Ulysses. The day is named after Leopold Bloom, the central character in Ulysses. The novel follows the life and thoughts of Leopold Bloom and a host of other characters – real and fictional – from 8am on 16 June 1904 through to the early hours of the following morning.

Why not?

June 16, 2019   Comments Off on Bloomsday

Magna Carta

Arms of King John

John, by the grace of God, king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and count of Anjou in the meadow which is called Runnymede, between Windsor and Staines, on the fifteenth day of June, 1215, signed the Great Charter in the presence of assorted heavily armed peers of the realm, who assured him it was the right thing to do.

The British Library has pictures of the Magna Carta available, but they are now requiring registration. Wikipedia has a nice discussion of the document.

The Magna Carta of 1297 is permanently residing in the US National Archives.

The Avalon Project has a translation of the 1215 version with an index and definitions.

John abided by the charter for several months, before he returned to business as normal, but the principle was established – no one is above the law.

June 15, 2019   Comments Off on Magna Carta

Flag Day

US Flag

Adopted as the flag of the United States of America by the Flag Resolution of 1777 enacted on 14 June, 1777.

The flag was first flown from Fort Stanwix, on the site of the present city of Rome, New York, on August 3, 1777. It was first under fire three days later in the Battle of Oriskany, August 6, 1777.

An official flag has a rise to run ratio of 1 to 1.9 [the flag should be 1.9 times as long as it is high] with the canton [the dark blue part] that rises over the top seven stripes with a run of 40% of the flag’s run.

The only time you will see a “correct” US Flag is if you see the official colors of a military unit. Most flags are 3’X5′ or 4’X6′ instead of 3’X5.7′ or 4’X7.6′.

Frances Bellamy, the Baptist minister and socialist who wrote the Pledge of Allegiance was from Rome, New York.

June 14, 2019   Comments Off on Flag Day

June 6, 1944 D-Day

This is the 75th anniversary of one of history’s biggest military gambles – the invasion of Normandy. There were so many things that had to fall into place for it to work, that it really is amazing that it did.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt told a news conference the invasion did not mean the war was over. He said: “You don’t just walk to Berlin, and the sooner this country realizes that the better.”

The war continued for almost a year, but FDR did not, dying a month before the German surrender.

This is what it was like when the US had adults in the White House.

June 6, 2019   5 Comments

June First

June 1st:

The official start of the hurricane season.

Events:
1495 – Friar John Cor records the first known batch of Scotch whisky.
1660 – Mary Dyer is hanged in Boston, Massachusetts, for defying a law banning Quakers from the colony. She is considered by some to be the last religious martyr in what would become the United States.
1890 – The United States Census Bureau begins using Herman Hollerith’s tabulating machine to count census returns.
1967 – The Beatles album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band is released.
1980 – The Cable News Network (CNN) begins broadcasting.

Births:
1563 – Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury, English statesman and spymaster (d. 1612)
1780 – Carl von Clausewitz, Prussian general (d. 1831)
1804 – Mikhail Glinka, Russian composer (d. 1857)

For some reason, I didn’t make the list.

June 1, 2019   7 Comments