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Saint George’s Day

Cross of St. George

Saint George is the patron saint of England, Georgia [the country], Bulgaria, Portugal, Catalonia, and the city of Moscow. Orthodox countries tend to celebrate George on November 23rd.

PETA condemns George for his senseless slaughter of dragons. The YWCA condemns the condemnation and wants to know when PETA is going to volunteer to be DragonChow™

International Day of the Book UNESCO

It is also the birth and death day of Billy the Bard, who was a great writer in desperate need of a spelling checker.

Master Shakespeare gave all of the best lines to villains supplying low humor to those who have read the Folio, e.g. Arlen Specter quoting Iago, reputedly in support of Clarence Thomas.

4 comments

1 jams O'Donnell { 04.24.10 at 3:56 am }

But people don’t like it when you mention St G’s patronage of syphilitics and herpes sufferers…
.-= last blog ..Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen =-.

2 Badtux { 04.24.10 at 10:59 am }

Once again, Harry Potter needs a spell checking. Most of us, on the other hand, are non-magical and thus instead need a spelling checker.

:).

– Badtux the Pedantic Penguin

3 Steve Bates { 04.24.10 at 1:21 pm }

I actually remember reading a short story (not by Rowling) of Harry Potter holding a job as a “spell checker” (sic)
.-= last blog ..Chinese Food… It’s What’s For Disaster* =-.

4 Bryan { 04.24.10 at 2:12 pm }

Well, Jams, no one wants to admit that the “aristocracy” were all originally gang leaders and highwaymen when you look at what they did. At its heart the feudal system was a protection racket and not much different than today’s crime families. It takes centuries to turn common criminals into heroes. I would imagine that STDs were quite common among those “heroic Crusaders” who introduced the cross of St. George to the world at large.

The only reason I wrote “spelling checker” in this year’s version, Badtux, is that I knew you would kvetch about “spell checker”. It has been known as spell checking since the days of SpellStar running on CP/M machines, before Rowling entered elementary school.